Decades Of Combined Experience, Thousands Of Cases Settled

  1. Home
  2.  » 
  3. Workplace Risks
  4.  » 
  5. Healthcare
  6.  » How To Monitor Yourself For Symptoms of a Brain Injury

How To Monitor Yourself For Symptoms of a Brain Injury

| Sep 22, 2020 | Healthcare, Injury Prevention

Edited By: Cecily Johnson, Legal Secretary


Many occupations pose risk for experiencing a potential brain injury that could have lasting implications. Professionals in construction, emergency/medical services, transportation, and agriculture are just some occupations where brain injuries are common. However, any workplace slip or fall could be the cause of a potential traumatic brain injury. As brain injuries are among the worst potential injuries someone can suffer on the job, it is important that you know how to identify one and what to do if you believe you or a family member might be suffering from one.

How To Identify a Potential Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)

Sometimes, a traumatic brain injury (TBI) is obvious right after someone gets hurt. They may suffer from a headache or experience symptoms like dizziness and nausea that make it clear that they need medical attention sooner rather than later. Unfortunately, many brain injury symptoms may not present themselves right away and could even appear weeks or even months post-injury. The best way to protect yourself after a potential brain injury is to report the accident to your employer when it happens and then monitor yourself for symptoms in the days that follow (even if you don’t think you need to see a doctor right away).

TBI Can Produce a Wide Range of Symptoms

Given that your brain regulates everything from your perception of pain to your internal temperature, it makes sense that brain injuries can produce symptoms ranging from memory issues or problems with balance to issues with falling asleep at night and changes in mood or personality. According to the CDC, common symptoms that people will experience after a brain injury include:

  • Difficulty thinking clearly
  • Sensitivity to noise or light
  • Trouble with balance
  • Sleep troubles
  • Irritability
  • Headache
  • Blurry vison
  • Nausea

 

Additionally, there are some serious symptoms that prompt imitate medical attention:

  • Headache that gets worse and does not go away
  • Weakness, numbness, or decreased coordination
  • Repeated vomiting or nausea
  • Slurred speech
  • Look very drowsy or cannot wake up
  • Have one pupil (the black part in the middle of the eye) larger than the other
  • Have convulsions or seizures
  • Cannot recognize people or places
  • Are getting more and more confused, restless, or agitated
  • Have unusual behavior
  • Lose consciousness

 

If you or someone you know is experiencing any of the above symptoms after a potential brain injury, seek medical attention immediately!

Have You Suffered From a Work-Related Brain Injury?

If you suspect that you suffered a brain injury because of a workplace incident, report the accident to your employer when it happens and then monitor yourself for symptoms in the days that follow (even if you don’t think you need to see a doctor right away). You may need workers’ compensation benefits for both your medical care and your lost wages while you recover. Brain injuries can alter your life and employability, so the sooner you take action, the better your chances of protecting yourself if you hurt your brain while working. In these cases, a reliable attorney can be invaluable.

Click here to set up a FREE consultation with one of our dedicated attorneys!


Resources:

Symptoms of Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI). (2019, March 11). Retrieved September 10, 2020, from https://www.cdc.gov/traumaticbraininjury/symptoms.html

Share This